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Did you know about student evaluations?

 

The Engineering Career Services office has a lot of great resources...maybe I am biased, but there are various magazines, handouts, student handbooks, etc. -all of which are available to help you with your job search. Student evaluations are also available. In 199 Hitchcock, you will find two large filing cabinets filled with your fellow engineering students' reviews of what it was like to work at their co-op or internship company.

 

 

Evaluations can be handy if you are simply trying to learn more about an employer...perhaps you are thinking about applying to a company or you have an upcoming interview. Evaluations are also beneficial after you have a job offer and are deciding whether or not to accept. Finding out what other engineering students thought about working at (insert company name here) will help you make a more informed decision.

 

 

 

"Learning is not … 

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Running out of work during your internship/co-op

When mid quarter evaluations are sent to students who are on a co-op or internship assignment, 95% of the responses are favorable for the learning experience both technically and professionally. However, there are those instances where students write back to me complaining that there is often “not enough” work to do. The reasons vary: supervisor travels and is very busy to monitor workloads or the project has ended or is at a point where testing is causing delays. Whatever the reason is that you find yourself with little engineering work to do while you’re at your co-op or internship, there are things you can do to improve this situation.

• First, I’d be sure to plan ahead and be sure to have regularly scheduled meeting times with your mentor/supervisor. Perhaps, this could be bi-weekly and if not available in person, utilize emails with agenda items and specific areas of interest … 

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Stress in a Good Way

I remember my first on-campus interview. I was so nervous I did not know what to say. I wore my roommate's jacket with the piano pin on it. I never played piano and was embarrassed to let the interviewer know that when he asked about it. Fortunately, I was honest and explained that I wanted to look as polished as possible for the interview and had to borrow a jacket.

I see many of you waiting in our lobby for your interviews and can tell you are nervous too (and some of you may be wearing your roommate's jacket). A little stress is a good thing, as long as you use it in a positive way. Prepare for that interview, get a haircut, polish your dress shoes and iron your best or borrowed clothes. So, when the interviewer calls your name, stand up, smile as you approach, and extend your … 

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International Students: Know When You Can Work

International students: If an employer asked you the following questions, would you be prepared?

• “When can you start to work?”
• “Are you authorized to work in the U.S.?”

Not only will you be asked these questions by a recruiter, but you may also have to answer them when completing an online application. You should know your employment options so that you can answer these questions with confidence.

If you are currently on F-1 Visa, you can legally work prior to graduation using Curricular Practical Training (CPT) for internships or after graduation using Optional Practical Training (OPT) for career employment. CPT allows students to work as interns prior to graduation – but only for one quarter per year and only if the work is directly related to their major field. OPT allows students to work in their major field for 12 months following graduation. If an employer … 

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Interviewing Part II: What Not to Say

 

 

 

 

Here’s what is “off the table” during an interview…

• Salary, benefits, perks, vacation, etc. These are not appropriate questions during the interview stage…asking them might give an employer the wrong impression about you (that money is your only concern, that you are assuming you already have the job, etc.). Once an offer is formally extended, then these topics are up for discussion.

I would also recommend against…

• Asking anything that’s obviously stated on the employer’s website or materials that you have been given in advance about the company. You don’t want to appear ill-prepared by asking what you should already know.

One last tip…

• When asked the question, “Why do you want this job?”—a good answer never includes, “because I want more experience.” Of course you want more experience…who doesn’t?! But this doesn’t sell you at all to a recruiter. When … 

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