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Perspectives: Student

Cool Co-op Project: My Year of Complete Secrecy

Today’s post is written by chemical engineering student, Kyle McLaughlin.  Kyle was selected by ECS as runner-up of the 2013 OSU College of Engineering Cool Co-op Award!  

"For the past year I co-oped with General Motors at the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  I had the coolest co-op in the country because of the great projects I was able to work on in the paint shop. I worked almost exclusively on the launch of the 2014 Corvette C7. I was sworn to absolute secrecy and product security was always a top priority.  There were certain areas of the plant where I was escorted through a key card access door to sign it with the security officer before working on my assignments. The car was unveiled on January 13th and there are still many aspects of my work that I cannot discuss publicly or privately … 

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Samuel Almeida wins contest for having Ohio's Coolest Co-op Project

 

ECS and the Ohio Cooperative Education Association (OCEA) recently ran simultaneous “Cool Co-ops Contests” where students with internships and/or co-ops were encouraged to share what made their experience cool—a project, the perks, or the people at the job.  Samuel Almeida won the “Projects” category of the OCEA contest.  He will be recognized at the organization’s annual conference and won a $250 award.  Samuel was also the overall ECS “Cool Co-op Contest” winner.  Read on to learn more about Samuel’s green engineering project and what made it so cool… 

“I co-oped at Honda of America Manufacturing in Marysville, Ohio in the Facilities department. One of the projects I worked on was to design and implement a control algorithm to provide peak efficiency in a dynamic cooling system. This project required me to study and learn subjects of which I had little knowledge, including PLC programming and … 

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Co-op Words of Wisdom

Today’s post is written by Katherine Waidelich. Katherine is majoring in mechanical engineering; she is also the Treasurer of the engineering internship and co-op honorary, Kappa Theta Epsilon.  Katherine has worked at Marathon Petroleum Company and atGrundfos / Peerless Pump Company.  Today she is sharing what she’s learned from co-oping.

Co-oping has been a great experience for me as a student and as a young professional.  It has allowed me to learn more about the ins and outs of what an engineer does on a typical workday.  I’ve worked with two companies while pursuing my undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering. 

On my first day of the job I did what everyone fears… I overslept and showed up late.  Making the wrong first impression was definitely a learning experience for me.  There is hope though!  If you make a mistake at work (which at some point—you … 

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Internships & Co-ops: Welcome the Unexpected!

Today’s post is written by Nick Lazar.  Nick is a senior, graduating this spring in mechanical engineering.  Nick is the President of Kappa Theta Epsilon, the engineering internship and co-op honorary.  He has worked at Lexmark, GE Lighting, and Cameron International.  Today he is sharing his experience from his most recent internship.

My summer internship with Cameron International in City of Industry, California was an amazing experience. Cameron is a Fortune 500 company that deals predominantly with oil and energy, but the plant where I was working dealt primarily with measurement systems and instrumentation.

Coming into the summer, I expected to be performing supply chain oriented work in more of an industrial engineering capacity.  Instead, I was put into a role that dealt with electrical and nuclear engineering, specifically the testing of electronic components.  The change in my role was intimidating at first, but I'm … 

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Co-Op Lessons Learned

 

Today’s post is written by Kyle McLaughlin.  Kyle is a junior in chemical engineering and is sharing his “lessons learned” from his recent co-op.

 

My co-op experience at General Motors has truly been life changing. Working in the “real world” and developing your soft skills truly puts school in perspective. You learn that the content of your classes is not all that is important; your ability to handle multiple assignments at once, engage in critical thinking in a fast-paced work environment, and communicate highly technical topics in everyday language.

 

The most important lesson I’ve learned from my internship is “people are your most important asset.” You can work in the same company for 50+ years and you will continue to learn new things on a daily basis. You need to learn from those around you. There is no such thing as having “too many mentors … 

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