You are here

Blog posts by Category

Networking

The Value of In-Person Interactions During Your Job Search

No one is denying it, we are right smack dab in the age of technology. Many people prefer texting to calling and scrolling social media to paying attention in class. Despite our dependence on technology and new ways of connecting with companies, it remains just as important as ever to make face-to-face connections with recruiters.

Personal connection is powerful.

The power of personally connecting through human interaction speeds up the relationship building process. In a ten-minute conversation we can learn more about each other than in six months of online searching. This goes both ways, meaning that you are able to gather much more information about a company’s culture by interacting with a representative than by simply researching online. Why do you think companies continue to travel to university campuses for recruitment? Despite the financial cost, personal interactions continue to be the top method for recruitment. The National Association of Colleges … 

Read More

Why You Should Job Shadow: An Engineering Student's Perspective

Are you looking for a chance to meet with top OSU employers and learn more about being an engineer? If so, consider signing up for the 2016 Job Shadow Program! The Job Shadow Program is a one day commitment over Spring Break (March 14-18). You can sign up for more than one shadow if you’d like. Below you’ll find Matt Glasgow’s (ISE student) insight into his job shadow experience during the 2015 program.

Where did you job shadow last year?

I attended a job shadow at LuK USA located in Wooster, Ohio. LuK is a German based company from the parent company Schaeffler, and they make torque converters for cars and trucks.

How was the event structured?

Upon arrival, a few members of the HR Department delivered a presentation that provided an overview of the company. The topics included information about LuK’s history, culture, and customer base. After the presentation … 

Read More

Consider a Professional Mentor

Have you ever wondered what your classmates are talking about when they refer to their mentor? Why are they important? And how do you go about finding one?

A mentor could be younger or older than the mentee, but what sets them apart is the mentor's level of experience or depth of knowledge in a particular area or field. A mentorship program is beneficial for personal development as well as professional development. Typically a mentorship program would include a person of less experience and a person of more experience sharing ideas and thoughts over the area of interest.

Aside from building a professional relationship with someone in the workforce, mentorships may provide you with new skills, knowledge, contacts, or even new job opportunities. More than likely, if you find a mentor that is really interested in your professional development, they will become more of a career coach helping you build … 

Read More

Networking Series Part III: Networking for Introverts

I have a confession to make—I am an introvert. This is something I have had to come to terms with in many aspects of my life. I embrace my introversion, but during my undergraduate job search I thought it was an obstacle. I kept hearing things like “build your network” and “put yourself out there.” It was so easy for people to say those words, but just hearing them made me anxious. Eventually, I decided that I was acting as my own roadblock to success by letting my thoughts take over. I had in my mind what it meant to be good at networking; envisioning this confident, extroverted person who spoke to everyone and gave out stacks of resumes at every turn. Then I found out that each person has their own way to network and that companies recognize the value of employing a variety of people. In the … 

Read More

Networking Part II: How to Work a Room

Knowing how to “work the room” at an event can make the difference between a stressful waste of time and a meaningful experience. Here are seven tips you can use to work the room, then make sure everyone you meet remembers you when you leave it!

  1. Make a plan. Do your homework! Can you get ahold of the guest list? If so, who do you want to meet? If possible, connect with a few individuals prior to the event. Connecting ahead of the face-to-face meeting can eliminate some of the discomfort that comes with meeting someone new at a networking event. Once you meet the individual, you can pick right up with where your conversation left off via LinkedIn or email.
  2. Create talking points. Read the news and think about (noncontroversial) topics that can be used for interesting conversation starters. Make an effort to ask open-ended questions, show enthusiasm and genuine interest … 
Read More

Pages