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Simple Strategies to Stress Less

Hello! My name is Mary DeCenzo LISW-S. Dr. Stefanie Day and I are your “Embedded” Clinicians from OSU Counseling and Consultation Services, which means we are specifically assigned to serve students enrolled in the College of Engineering. 

Now that were are officially half way through the 2019-2020 academic year, you may likely feel relieved that you have finished your fall semester final exams and have hopefully enjoyed a break in the action and stress of student life. However, you may also be experiencing feelings of nervousness, worries or fears about what could happen in the upcoming spring semester. While such apprehension is common, many students may experience symptoms that are so intense that the symptoms pose a barrier to a student’s ability to function physically or socially, or present a barrier to moving forward in the student’s education. 

Below are links to a couple of articles you may find … 

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Winter Break Job Search Checklist

For most people, Winter Break is a time to forget all about their studies and get some much needed— and deserved— rest and relaxation. While Winter Break should be used as a time to recharge for the spring semester, there are some things you can do to optimize your search for an internship, co-op, or full-time job. Engineering Career Services has compiled a simple checklist of activities you can do during Winter Break to kick start your spring search and reduce your stress during the semester.

1. Update your resume.

Before you can apply to any positions, it’s important that your resume reflects all of the new projects, roles, and opportunities you completed over the fall semester. Even if your projects or jobs are ongoing, be sure to update it with your recent contributions. A strong resume is a current resume! If you need help updating your document, use ECS … 

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Not Sold On Your "Traditional" Engineering Career Path? Consider Technical Sales

Today’s blog was written by Megan Conway, Campus Talent Acquisition Specialist at Eaton.

I remember being in my sophomore year of college for my engineering degree and asking all my friends in engineering what they wanted to do. That was such a hard question for me to answer at the time. My sophomore year was the first year that I was seriously thinking about an internship and attending the career fair at my school but was completely lost on what my interests were and what companies I wanted to talk to. Some of my friends were interested in design, some research, some in helping the environment, and they all seemed to know what companies they wanted to talk to at the career fair. For me, I knew that I didn’t like sitting at a desk all day, that I loved working in a team environment to solve problems, and that … 

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Reflections from a Tech Recruiter at Capital One

Today's guest blog features Liz Beecy, Ohio State Tech Recruiter for Capital One.

The Future Direction of Tech & Ways to Prepare Now 

Technology is constantly evolving and engineering in the corporate banking world is no different. There is a focus on customer experience while utilizing the latest tools and technologies. Although, we have found it takes more than just the latest and greatest technology to be successful. It takes great people. We have found that investing in the development of our associates will lead to greater success as an organization and the Technology Development/Internship Programs are a direct reflection of our emphasis on associate development. Since technology is ever changing, we need to change with it. Working in an agile environment allows us to do so. Our engineering teams are about 6-10 engineers per team working to drive products to production across multiple functions.

With such a wide range … 

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Career Transitions as a Woman Engineer

Today’s blog is written by Renee Desing, current PhD Candidate in Engineering Education with a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering.

Throughout my career, I have worked in a variety of roles and industries and experienced many career transitions. These transitions include changing roles within a company, switching companies, and returning to graduate school. However, the toughest transition for me was my first transition from college to the workplace. Even though I attended a university that was 28% women, it was not until after I graduated that I realized what it really meant to be a woman in engineering. I found that while my undergraduate degree prepared me for the engineering responsibilities of my role, I was unprepared to deal with gender-based challenges. I have experienced discrimination and harassment because I was a woman engineer. While I worked hard on my job, there were times when I was … 

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