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Interviewing: General Advice

Giving credit, getting credit

You’ve likely had a lot of engineering projects in your entry-level engineering courses. Most of those projects were probably teamwork based. There were smaller individual parts to make the whole project work. You’ve gained valuable, real-world experience that can be transferred into a company setting. When you’re in an interview or even talking to potential employers, how do you talk about these projects? Are the recruiters looking for a team-player or someone who did the whole project? How do you phrase what you did verses what the team did?

The key is honesty. Give credit where credit is due. Employers will be able to tell if you are not telling the whole truth about your role in a project. It may feel awkward to talk about yourself, but the interview is a time where you need to sell yourself to the potential employer. The employer needs to be convinced that you … 

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It’s tricky! Answering tough interview questions

Difficult interview questions are meant to challenge job candidates and make you think on your feet! Some questions during an interview can seem rather simple on the surface but are designed to give the employer a better sense of who you are and whether you're a good fit for the team and company. Here are a few tricky interview questions and how to handle your answers:

Tell me about yourself.

The “tell me about yourself” question is often asked during interviews in order to assess your communication ability and how your experience ties into the current opportunity. Many candidates make the mistake of diving into extensive details regarding childhood, schooling, hobbies, etc. A strong answer to this question includes an overview of relevant work experience, qualifications, career interests and what you can bring to the position and company at hand.

Describe a time when you failed.

The first step to … 

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Meet engineering employers via ECS' Recruiter in Residence Program

Would you like more practice with interviews? Would you like to receive career advice from professionals from various STEM fields? Then Recruiter in Residence is just for you! ECS' Recruiter in Residence Program provides an opportunity to network with employers while receiving career advice, job search guidance, resume tips, and a chance to practice your interviewing skills. Here are the reasons why you should take advantage of Recruiter in Residence this fall:

  • Network with employers outside of career fairs.  Networking is a great opportunity to build connections with people you may never have thought of connecting with before. Remember, it’s not always about what you know, but who you know!
  • Receive career advice from industry professionals.  Even though the Internet can provide some career tips or job search hints, receiving such advice and/or tips from working professionals is invaluable.
  • Practice makes perfect.  By participating in mock interviews, you are … 
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March Mock Interview Month Winner

During the month of March, ECS hosted a mock interview competition via InterviewStream. InterviewStream is an online mock interview platform. InterviewStream allows students to do a virtual mock interview from any computer with a webcam and microphone. Engineering students were to choose one of eight mock interview options and complete a mock interview following the S.T.A.R. model for behavioral interviews. Their interviews were then submitted to an ECS advisor for feedback.

The winner for ECS’ Mock Interview Month is…Jack Hsueh. Congratulations!

Get to know more about our mock interview winner and his interview advice.  

About Jack

Jack Hsueh is an Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student graduating in May 2017. He chose Ohio State University because of its depth and broad research. His favorite engineering class at OSU is Advanced RF IC. That class has taught Jack about circuit design of the entire receiver front-end … 

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What is Nonverbal Communication?

No matter what environment you are in – a job setting, an interview, a networking event; your nonverbal communication is equally as important as what you say.  In fact, I’d argue that it is MORE important.  Take this example:  your supervisor asks you to come in on a Saturday to complete a project, and you say “yes”.  However, you say it with an obvious eye roll.  While you are being agreeable, he will know that you are unhappy with the idea of working on the weekend.  Our gestures often say more than our words and can indicate our true feelings. 

“Nonverbal cues” refers to all communication between people that do not have a direct verbal translation.  Examples of these are body movements and facial expressions.  These nonverbal cues are extremely important in the work place because how others perceive you impacts … 

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