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Etiquette & Professionalism

What People See When You Think No One is Watching

Working at the front desk of Engineering Career Services allows me to have a front-row seat to recruiting season. And while I do my best to make sure that no one goes into an interview with a crooked tie, a flipped collar, or a piece of toilet paper stuck to their shoe,  I can’t fix everything. I’d like to offer some common sense advice on ways to make sure that you don’t sink your interview before it’s even begun.

  1. Be early. It’s the most important thing you can do to make sure that the first thing a recruiter sees is you looking calm, cool, and collected. Planning to arrive at least 10-15 minutes early allows you to not rush (few things are worse than sitting in a small room with someone who just ran in a suit), to check yourself in a mirror to make sure everything’s where it should … 
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Facebook and Your Professional Persona

It’s nearly impossible to avoid social media, especially as a college student. And many of us would agree that there isn’t anything inherently wrong with that. But unfortunately numerous students don’t realize the potential implications of posting things irresponsibly—especially when the time comes to make the transition into the professional world.

Once you decide to pursue an internship, co-op or full-time job, you’re likely spending a lot of time focusing on your job search. After all, that’s the whole point of getting a degree, right? Something that doesn’t occur to a lot of students is that they may need to do some “cleaning up” of their online presence prior to kicking off their job hunt…especially if it is indicative of your partying habits.

Employers have begun turning to social media sites, especially Twitter and Facebook, to pre-screen their candidates. Recruiters don’t want to see photos of you dominating in beer … 

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How to decline an offer graciously

You got the offer! You should be excited right? Well, sometimes the offer does not meet your expectations (if this is the case—come in and see us at ECS, we may be able to help!) or you feel that the company just isn’t the right fit for you. That is totally normal. Just remember that you don’t want to burn any bridges so if you find yourself in this situation here is what you should do…

First, you MUST inform the employer as soon as possible that you are not going to take the position. A phone call is preferred but they may ask you to follow up in writing. Always leave the door open for future possibilities, so remain polite and professional. You don’t have to go into detail about why you’re declining the offer.

Here’s what you might say:

Dear Mr. Jones,

I truly appreciated the opportunity to … 

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Avoiding Dining Dilemmas Pt. II

Today we're focusing on more ways you can be successful when dining with employers. If you missed Avoiding Dining Dilemmas Pt. I, you can read it here.

Students often ask questions concerning proper etiquette for occasions such as dining with a potential employer during an on-site interview. In an earlier blog, I discussed avoiding common dining dilemmas (see link above). I wanted to provide additional tips that will help you avoid some other common issues.

As soon as you are seated, place the napkin across your lap. The napkin should remain folded with the fold pointed toward you. If you need to leave the table for any reason, place the napkin on your chair. Once the meal is finished, place the napkin to the left side of your plate. You should never place the napkin on your table until you have finished eating your meal. Be sure to use your … 

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Handling unwanted job offers

So – you’ve got a job offer, but you’re just not sure you if want it. What should you do?

 

Whatever you do, avoid the most common mistakes: accepting even if you’re pretty sure you don’t want it , thinking you’ll keep looking until you find something you really like, or simplynot responding because you feel awkward turning it down.By making either of these mistakes, you may be blocking what might be the perfect opportunity for another Ohio State student.

 

 

Here’s what you should do.

 

 

First of all, you don’t need to accept (or decline) on the spot – but you do need to respond promptly.Whether the offer comes via phone or email, get back to the employer within 24 hours if possible.

 

 

“Thanks very much for the job offer! When do you need my answer? After I’ve had a little … 

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