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Etiquette & Professionalism

Why You Should Attend ECSC: An Engineering Student’s Perspective

Today's ECS Job Blog is brought to you by Mary-Kate Mullinger.  Mary-Kate is a Chemical Engineering student graduating this May 2017.  She is currently the Kappa Theta Epsilon President.  

I know what an exciting time it is to be back on campus.  Your last summer internship is over, college friends are coming back to campus for their final first day of school, and the excitement of football season is here in full force!  With all of the campus hub-bub, it can be easy to overlook the next step in our lives- starting our first full-time job.  It is so important to take advantage of the fall recruiting process in order to set yourself up for success after your walk across the field at the 'Shoe.  But how can you best take advantage of the biggest recruitment season for employers?

You can start by attending the Engineering Career Success Conference … 

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What is Nonverbal Communication?

No matter what environment you are in – a job setting, an interview, a networking event; your nonverbal communication is equally as important as what you say.  In fact, I’d argue that it is MORE important.  Take this example:  your supervisor asks you to come in on a Saturday to complete a project, and you say “yes”.  However, you say it with an obvious eye roll.  While you are being agreeable, he will know that you are unhappy with the idea of working on the weekend.  Our gestures often say more than our words and can indicate our true feelings. 

“Nonverbal cues” refers to all communication between people that do not have a direct verbal translation.  Examples of these are body movements and facial expressions.  These nonverbal cues are extremely important in the work place because how others perceive you impacts … 

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Recruiter Advice: How to Stand Out in the Crowd

My money says that you want a job, perhaps not this semester, but eventually. The problem is that all of your peers reading this also want a job, possibly even the same job you want. There is a lot of competition in the job search. Many of your resumes are practically identical to each other. Same first year project, same list of technology, a similar list of organizations, and a quick print of a degree audit shows that your classes and GPA are also neck and neck. So how do you stand out?  Show them what’s not on the resume. Show them you. Show them that you are professional and prepared.  

It seems like common knowledge, but many recruiters report that students aren’t prepared and/or lack common professional behavior. You can’t add classes or gain industry experience a week before a job interview, but there are things that you … 

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Post Interview Checklist

The interview is over, and the waiting game begins. It seemed to go well, but you’re still waiting to hear back. What should you be doing after the interview?

Send a thank you.

A thoughtful thank you should be sent to the recruiter(s) within 24 hours. CareerBuilder conducted a survey, which showed that 22% of employers are less likely to hire a candidate who did not send a thank you, and 91% of employers liked being thanked for the interview. Recognize that many company representatives conducting interviews are taking on recruiting as an addiitonal task to their engineering job, so thanking them for the the extra effort can go a long way.

Refer to your notes after the interview and write something thoughtful. Email is the quickest way to follow up. A nice additional touch would be promptly mailing out a personal, hand-written thank you note.  

Follow the interviewer’s guidelines, and … 

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Common Mistakes New Grads Make at Their First Job

A college diploma may get you a full-time job after graduation, but it doesn’t guarantee that you will stay employed or get promoted. Once you do secure that dream job, it’s time to work just as hard at getting off on the right foot. While making a mistake or two is, well, part of the job—and part of the learning process—below are a few common ones that new graduates often make:

Misdirection

We all get stumped or puzzled with a problem at work. Realize that unexpected problems are expected, and a manager’s job is to ensure his/her team is operating at top performance. Rather than waste hours or even days on trying to figure this issue out on your own, ask your colleagues or supervisor for direction and advice. Most bosses are more understanding than you’d think. Asking specific questions is expected. In fact, asking the right questions will show … 

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